NATIONAL HISTORY DAY IN ARIZONA

National History Day Banner - Debate and Diplomacy

 

NHDAZ Events, Workshops, and Competitions

2022 Theme Book – Debate & Diplomacy in History: Successes, Failures, Consequences

Watch the video!




Learn more on the NHD website.

National History Day in Arizona is supported by a grant from Arizona Humanities.

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NHDAZ Students! We’re excited for another NHD cycle! Here you will find information about researching, how to access workshops, and other resources to help you create the best project possible! 

PLEASE NOTE: This year’s competition cycle will be mostly digital and we will be meeting via Google Meet. Please do not share the Google Meet link with anyone. 

Find Your Contest Portal

History Education Workshops

What Is History?




National History Day in Arizona 2022 Theme Workshop




NHDAZ Thesis and Secondary Sources




Navigating the Archives




Analyzing Primary Sources




NHDAZ Project Drafting




PLEASE NOTE: This year’s competition cycle will be mostly digital and students will be meeting via Google Meet. Please do not share the Google Meet link with anyone to protect the privacy of the students.

Find Your Contest Portal

PLEASE NOTE: This year’s competition cycle will be mostly digital and students will be meeting via Google Meet. Please do not share the Google Meet link with anyone to protect the privacy of the students.

Find Your Contest Portal 

NHDAZ would not be possible without the support of Arizona’s history community! Want to get involved? Here are a few ways to help:

  • Judge an NHDAZ contest!
    • We hold our contests in the spring, and are always looking for history-loving adults to help students produce the best possible projects! Not only will you be supporting Arizona’s students, but judging NHDAZ contests can earn you professional development credits. Judge recruitment starts in November.
  • Join our advisory committees!
    • The NHDAZ Advisory Committee and NHDAZ Ambassadors are two related groups that help ensure the future of NHDAZ. Our advisory committee, which consists mostly of teachers, history and education experts, and parents, helps the coordinator make decisions about the program. NHDAZ Ambassadors promotes NHDAZ in local and state government, schools, and within arts and culture organizations.

Want to get involved with NHDAZ? Email the NHDAZ coordinator at [email protected].

National History Day Arizona WordcloudArizona Historical Society Digital Collection Topic Guides

Debate and Diplomacy: Successes, Failures, and Consequences

Looking to do research at an Arizona Historical Society Archive, but can’t get to us? Check out these online collections!

The US/Mexico Border

The establishment and security of a border is a diplomatic agreement, but not all parties come to the negotiating table as equals–and some groups are left out completely. Consider when the US-Mexico border was physically established and how it has changed overtime–geographically and culturally. How have debates about border policy shaped the US/Mexico borderlands? What does that mean for people who have lived in what is now the borderlands for generations? Where does Native Sovereignty fit in?

Check out Cutting Sign on the Line: The Arizona Border Patrol of the 1920s & 1930s through the lens of Earl Fallis: https://azhsarchives.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p15812coll2

Japanese Incarceration

Japanese Incarceration was not only a failure of diplomacy, but in many respects a failure of American Democracy. You might be interested in exploring public debate surrounding Japanese Incarceration during World War II, or perhaps interested in the debate around reparations and redress later in the 20th century. Arizona has unique stories to tell about the experiences of Japanese-Americans–incarcerated or not. 

Check out A Celebration of the Human Spirit: Japanese-American Relocation Camps in Arizona: https://azmemory.azlibrary.gov/digital/collection/ahfreloc

Mexican-American Civil Rights Movements

The Civil Rights Movement contains several simultaneous debates–one of the primary ones being between powerful systems and people, and the oppressed group, but other debates within the oppressed group itself, usually along the lines of class, race, gender, and sexuality. Mexican-American Civil Rights Movements from the 1930s to the 1970s reflect the same kinds of conflict. You might explore how class differences in Mexican-American communities impacted the kinds of diplomacy options available to people as they fought for their Civil Rights. How did national debates about identity, belonging, and language shape Mexican-American Civil Rights struggles?

Check out the Mexican-Heritage Project collection: https://azmemory.azlibrary.gov/digital/collection/ahsmexican

Harold Giss, Arizona, and the Equal Rights Amendment 

All politics are local! Even big national debates, like ones about the Equal Rights Amendment, have local stories. Explore the papers of Arizona legislator Harold Giss (D) to learn more about how Arizonans debated the Equal Rights Amendment. What anxieties of the time did Arizonans express in their communication with Giss? How did national organizations try to sway Giss?

Check out the Equal Rights Amendment collection: https://azhsarchives.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/eraaz

Want to explore more Arizona history? Have an idea for a project but don’t know how to get started? Email [email protected]!

Please check back Fall 2021 for Classroom Grant opportunities.

For more information email us at [email protected].

Please note: Special awards for NHDAZ 2022 may change without notice and additional prizes may be added. Please check this page in Fall 2021.

Special Awards Nomination Process

Students who are promoted to the State competition can self nominate or be nominated by either their teacher or the NHDAZ coordinator. Students will self nominate during the State competition registration. Teachers should notify the NHDAZ coordinator of students they would like to nominate for the awards. While students may be nominated for multiple awards, students will only be awarded one prize. The project that the students submit to the NHDAZ State competition is the project that the special awards committee will evaluate. Unless otherwise specified, the NHDAZ Advisory Council will evaluate student projects.  Students selected for awards will be notified at the State Award Ceremony.

Babbitts Family Award
Sponsored by the Babbitts Family
For Junior and Senior Division, group or individual projects. One $200 prize.
Projects nominated for this award must relate to the annual theme, Debate and Diplomacy: Successes, Failures, and Consequences, and the histories of either World War I or World War II. Best entries in the category include but are not limited to military, social, cultural, technological, or political histories. There is no preference for place, but the time period of study must be within the standard periodization of the World Wars, from about 1914 to about 1945. Award winner will be selected by the Babbitts Family. 

AZJHS Award for Histories of Anti-Semitism
Sponsored by the Arizona Jewish Historical Society
For Junior and Senior Division, group or individual projects. One $250 prize
Projects nominated for this award must relate to the annual theme, Debate and Diplomacy: Successes, Failures, and Consequences, and the study of global Anti-Semitism. Best entries in the category include but are not limited to military, social, cultural, technological, or political histories. There is no preference for place or time of study, but students must meaningful connect past and present experiences of Anti-Semitism. Award winner will be selected by AZJHS. 

PHA Award for Best Holocaust History
Sponsored by the Phoenix Holocaust Associaton
For Junior and Senior Division, group or individual projects. One $250 prize
Projects nominated for this award must relate to the annual theme, Debate and Diplomacy: Successes, Failures, and Consequences, and study of the Holocaust. Best entries in the category include but are not limited to military, social, cultural, technological, or political histories. Award winner will be selected by PHA. 

Best Middle-Eastern History Award
Sponsored by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, University of Arizona
For Junior and Senior Division, group or individual projects. One $200 prize
Projects must relate to the annual theme, Debate and Diplomacy in History: Successes, Failures, and Consequences and the history of the Middle East, providing the opportunity for projects to explore a vast range of topics. These topics may include but are not limited to the First World War and the creation of the modern Middle East state system, the ArabIsraeli conflict, and the Iranian Revolution. There is no preference for time period, however, the project’s geographical scope should span among the countries and regions of North Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, the Persian Gulf, Anatolia, and the Eastern Mediterranean.

Arizona Archives Award
Sponsored by the Arizona Archives Alliance
For Junior and Senior Division, group or individual projects. Two $250 prizes
The Best Use of Arizona Archival Collections Award encourages students in both the junior and senior divisions to include in their research those primary source materials either created in Arizona or held in an Arizona archival repository that represent a first-hand account contemporaneous with their chosen topic. These awards are intended to recognize projects that have utilized Arizona archival collections in a substantial way and encourage students to become familiar with local archives and local archival institutions.

Equality in History
Sponsored by the Arizona Historical Society
For Junior and Senior Division, group or individual projects. Two $150 prizes
Projects nominated for this award must relate to the annual theme, Debate and Diplomacy: Successes, Failures, and Consequences, and the histories of underrepresented people. The best entries for equality in history include but are not limited to the exploration of an historical topic or event, a bibliographic project, or a project that focuses on the contribution, accomplishments, experiences, and perspectives of People of Color, Indigenous People, members of the LGBTQIA+ community, children, and other underrepresented groups. Projects can also explore the efforts of underrepresented groups and their allies in the fight to have the same status in certain respects, often including civil, voting, and property rights, freedom of speech, marriage and gender equality, and equal access to social goods and services.

Best Women’s History
Sponsored by the Arizona Historical Society
For Junior and Senior Division, group or individual projects. Two $150 prizes
Projects nominated for this award must relate to the annual theme, Debate and Diplomacy: Successes, Failures, and Consequences, and women’s history. The best entries in women’s history include but are not limited to a gender-based exploration of an historical topic or event, a bibliographic project about a woman or women, or focuses on the contribution, accomplishments, experiences, and perspectives of women.

Best Arizona History
Sponsored by the Arizona Historical Society
For Junior and Senior Division, group or individual projects. Two $200 prizes
Projects must relate to the annual theme, Debate and Diplomacy: Successes, Failures, and Consequences, and the history of Arizona, including Arizona before 1530, Spanish Arizona, Mexican Arizona, and the New Mexico Territory before 1863.

Best Youth Project
Sponsored by the Arizona Historical Society
For Youth Division, group or individual projects. Prize details pending
This award is for the best entry in the youth division based on the project’s connection to the theme and success of argumentation. 

Questions? Contact [email protected].

 

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